Dec 26, 2018 22:55:29

proposals, estimates, structuring fee's (more Futur notes)

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lowen flowen

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These notes are about bidding on a web-project.


Start with an RFP - request for proposal.

The client has to send you project requirements so you know what you work with.


A website requires a scope: strategy/discovery to figure out what you're doing and making

Ask for examples of other sites. Is it an app? is it a couple of pages? etc. 

Perhaps you can sell them a strategy or branding workshop. Or just go on your assumptions.


First impression 

- being comfortable with each other: match and mirror behaviour, make it an easy process, give time to the client, connect with the client, persuade.
- be knowledgeable
- have rapport


Go to the first meeting:

- If you don't like small-talk, that doesn't move the business, start immediately with asking: "what would you like to take away from this meeting?"
- Get to know each other,
- Get to know the budget - can they pay you?
- Get them to know you - can you do it?


People comparison-shop. Make sure to stand out from the competition.

Be upfront and honest about the situation.

Just ask.


if you already got the meeting, feel comfortable and assured. You were already researched, googled or whatever. Getting a business meeting is not always easy. You are already validated.


Deal with other low-paid-budget options:

Make sure they know that without having a meaningful dialogue about the product/project it doesn't make sense to deal with someone who just offers a number. Make clear it is simply irresponsible. Plant a seed of doubt about the competitors who simply work for a fixed price a.k.a. cheap labour.


Use these criteria to know if the lead is qualified to work with you:

- budget
- timeline
- a good (creative) fit on the project
- a personal fit (always listen to your gut, not the money)


When the client insists that you put together an estimate and you don't have enough information, but you do want to work with them:
(from the book "pitching manifesto", memorise this, know this:)

"Mr/Mrs ..., I am not in the business of building proposals that cost time and money to do. I need to know how real this project and the budget is. I need days to put this stuff together and if it's of any value to you, that's what it takes. 

Now, there are 2 things we can do: We can go over this together so I can understand the project better. We can talk about the budget. What is realistic and optimistic. The other way is I will bill you for an estimate. You pay me a thousand dollar and I will build you an estimate, but I need to get paid for my time."




So, understand business and marketing objectives.


Create a template for a proposal.

Proposal has qualifications, client testimonials, the approach and process, a couple of relevant projects, a timeline and a budget. Or just buy one!




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