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Mar 24, 2019 22:57:07

Why is getting started so hard?

by @juliasaxena PATRON | 206 words | 🐣 | 273💌

Julia Saxena

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Total posts: 273💌
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Yesterday, I wrote a post about if I should learn how to code. Today, I thought a little further. What do I actually want to achieve? 

For the start, I'd just like to have my own website to show the work that I do. 

I don't really need to use code to achieve that, do I? Creating a simple website shouldn't be this hard at all. Millions of people have done that before. So, why don't I just get started? 

Because I'm overthinking it! 

Here are the thoughts that get in the way:

  • I haven't done it before so I'm not entirely sure where to start. 
  • Which hosting service should I choose?
  • Wordpress? Or something else?
  • What should I name it?
  • How should I structure the site?
  • What will it cost to maintain it?
  • What if it doesn't look professional? 

These sound so silly as I'm writing them down. 

The only answer I need is: Just start with SOMETHING and the rest will figure itself out along the way. It's not rocket science. 

I'll put it on my to-do list for this week. I'll dedicate time for it. I'll get started. I'll take one step at a time. I'll keep going until I have a result. 




  • 1

    @juliasaxena - there are lots of no-code options today. So, learning how to "code" is different than getting some result. It's a huge distinction - because you might be naturally more tuned in to getting some result and it doesn't require that you understand or write any of the underlying code. For example. I could code up something like 200wad - but I don't need to. It's already done for me ( us ).

    Brian Ball avatar Brian Ball | Mar 24, 2019 09:00:21
  • 1

    @juliasaxena

    Also getting started is hard because we are creatures of habit. I think the ubiquitous craving for novelty is actually simply a symptom of the disease of not having good, fulfilling, sustainable habits.

    It's kind of an inaccurate perception that humans like novelty. I think it is most human to desire habits and routine. And actually it is simply because most people's habits and routines suck that they think they want novelty and sensationalism.

    But this is why it's hard to get started. Because getting started means doing something that isn't yet a habit or routine. And so the only things that are easy to get started are things that are sensationalized. Like drugs or other sensational stuff.

    Have you ever noticed that even when your full... you cannot eat another piece of steak or another wholesome food? However you can still eat cake? It is because that cake is sensationalized. So sweet that your tongue still enjoys it when your belly doesn't.

    Learning to code... or learning anything that is good in the long run usually is usually not sensationalized. It is just a wholesome meal. And a lot of people already have full bellies. They must focus and empty their belly to make room for their wholesome meal. This usually takes time and also the subtraction of the useless and sensational excess.

    Anyways yeah. Getting started -- on something meaningful and fulfilling -- is hard because fulfilling things almost always require habit. And getting started means that habit is absent.

    Abe avatar Abe | Mar 24, 2019 14:08:57
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    @juliasaxena

    "For the start, I'd just like to have my own website to show the work that I do. "

    If that is your only goal then there's no need to learn code. What are your other goals though? You said that's just 'for the start'

    Also yoru previous article cited learning code for reasons other than 'achievement'. It sounded like the main reason for learning code was to be literate in the contemporary world. In that case there's no need to link it directly to such a concrete ROI.

    I think that more important than learning code for that above reason of contemporary literacy would actually be project/social management. Like the ability to complete projects in a collaborative form. This doesn't always require you learning code since there are so many people who know how to code already.

    Abe avatar Abe | Mar 24, 2019 13:59:48
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