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Mar 09, 2019 15:00:08

Started Reading "Daily Rituals: How Artists Work" by @psy

by @OnepostersGems PATRON | 335 words | 🐣 | 174💌

200WaD Research Lab: Oneposters

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Total posts: 174💌
Total words: 48536 (194 pages 📄)

Jan 06, 2019 09:40:47 @psy 


"Decide what you want or ought to do during the day, then always do it at the exactly same moment"

This book is Written by Mason Currey.

This book is about how some of the greatest minds of the past 400 years approached the same task -- that is, How they made the time each day to do their best work, how they organized their schedules in order to be creative and productive.

"Tell me what you eat and I shall tell you what you are." - French gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin once wrote.

John Cheever thought that you couldn't even type a business letter without revealing something of your inner self.

One's working habits influence the work itself, and Vice Versa.

V.S. Pritchett writes, " The great men turn out to be all alike. They never stop working. They never lose a minute. It is very depressing."

W.H. Auden (1907-1973)

Routine, in an intelligent man, is a sign of ambition.

He checks his watch over and over again.

Eating, drinking, writing, shopping, crossword, puzzles, even the mailman's arrival -- all are timed to the minute and with accompanying routines.

The surest way to discipline passion is to discipline time.

Decide what you want or ought to do during the day, then always do it at the exactly same moment every day and passion will give you no trouble.

Auden rose shortly after 6 AM, made himself a coffee and settled down to work.

His mind was sharpest from 7 AM - 11:3 0M and he rarely failed to take advantage of utilizing these productive hours.

He resumed his work after lunch and continued into the late afternoon.

Cocktails began at 6:30 with several guests and strong vodka martinis. Continued with dinner and more conversation.

He went to bed early, never later than 11:00 and as he grew older, close to 9:30PM

To maintain his energy and concentration, the poet relied on amphetamines, taking a dose of Benzedrine each morning, and at night, he used Seconal or another sedative to get to sleep.

Francis Bacon (1909-1992)

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